Protect Your Network Using Defense in Depth

Protect Your Network Using Defense in Depth

The old defenses against cyberattacks–firewalls, antivirus programs and operating system patches–worked well when the security perimeter was the office. Now that remote work is here to stay and more devices are connected to company networks, protecting networks is more complicated. Read on to learn how defense in depth, an integration of individual tools, can help you better protect your technological assets. The Significance of Defense in Depth   With business operations having altered in the last several years, more endpoints are connected to networks, and the threat surface expands. Not every remote worker may have the most up-to-date antivirus protection, for example. Bad actors could use brute-force attacks, seeking entry into numerous parts of the network. With defense in depth, other controls would keep the criminals from getting very far. This redundancy can give administrators time to enact countermeasures to keep the intruder from penetrating the network deeply Typically, defense in depth involves three layers of controls–administrative, physical and technical. Administrative controls have to do with the policies and procedures that workers follow; for example, restricting permission to certain portions of the network, and allowing access to the data and applications they need to do their work (least privilege). Another layer involves physical security, and protects data centers and IT systems from threats like data theft. These controls include guards, security cameras and biometrics and/or ID cards. The layers of controls are working at different layers yet are integrated to provide a strong defense against cyberattack.   Getting Started with Defense in Depth   But where to start? CompTIA’s article on the topic makes several suggestions. One is to...
Use Desktop as a Service to Secure Remote Work

Use Desktop as a Service to Secure Remote Work

More than ever, your employees are working outside the office; this trend is expected to continue. Therefore your company needs the flexibility, reliability and security of a virtual connection. Read on to learn about Desktop as a Service (DaaS) and how it can help you keep your business running smoothly.   Make Desktop as a Service (DaaS) Work for You Desktop as a Service (DaaS), with its flexibility, reliability and security, is invaluable for businesses with remote workers. Workers can access systems, data and applications via the cloud, with just an Internet connection and a web browser. The service provider furnishes the infrastructure, network resources and storage in the cloud, and users’ computers are connected to the virtual desktop, and can access data and applications. Rapid deployment means that a new device can be connected to the virtual desktop, and later disconnected if needed; this will help businesses cope with fluctuating demand at different times of the day or year. If demand on one server is too great, all machines can be migrated to a different server.  Remote IT support can be given by the service provider, preventing downtime and keeping your systems running.    Desktop as a Service is Affordable and Secure Desktop as a Service can be affordable by managing consumption during peak business hours and the cloud subscription model allows companies to pay just for the resources they use. Service providers can help manage consumption by reducing available resources during off-peak hours. When it comes to security, IT service providers can quickly create a new desktop in case of a ransomware attack, so that data and...
Technologies That Support Remote Work

Technologies That Support Remote Work

Many companies realized the benefit of remote employees working from home. With companies competing to be the employer of choice, ability to work remotely has become a benefit many job hunters are looking for. With remote work becoming even more popular, technologies like cloud, software-defined wide-area networking (SD-WAN) and more have helped to provide a fast, secure and connected work environment. Read on to learn more about how cloud-based technologies support the remote-work experience   Take Advantage of the Cloud   Since it’s unlikely for remote workers to have IT infrastructure at home, the cloud supports remote access to a company’s applications and data. With just an Internet connection and a web browser needed to access a virtual desktop, remote workers can easily communicate, collaborate and complete tasks. Data and applications reside within the cloud, accessible to workers in their home offices. Better yet, SD-WAN can help keep traffic moving and business running smoothly.   Keep Things Moving with SD-WAN   A software-defined wide-area network, or SD-WAN, keeps bandwidth moving in order to give workers and customers a seamless and enjoyable user experience. Based on criteria that are set up ahead of time, SD-WAN can direct traffic in the most efficient way; if one route is bottlenecked or down for some reason, traffic gets redirected efficiently and your employees remain productive. Unlike traditional wide area networking, SD-WAN provides users a direct route to cloud resources. Not only is SD-WAN fast, it is secure even with transmission of great amounts of data. With such robust technology, workers can communicate and collaborate even more effectively.   Collaborate Using Unified Communications  ...
Unified Communications Can Help Remote Workers Collaborate

Unified Communications Can Help Remote Workers Collaborate

With working from home more and more common, companies benefit from their workers collaborating and communicating easily with each other. One solution to consider is Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS)–an integrated, Internet-based platform that helps workers access videoconferencing, chat, file sharing and more. Remote work is potentially easier and more efficient. Read on to learn more about this cloud-based technology.   The Benefits of Unified Communications for Remote Work   The tools workers need to be efficient and productive are inherently part of this cloud-based solution. With Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS), all that is needed to access the integrated system is an Internet connection. Workers can then use video conferencing tools like Teams, Webex and Zoom, can share files via email, and can even access customer information almost instantly to quickly serve clients. Voice mails are converted to emails, making it easy to access messages anywhere. The consistent reliability of UCaaS is provided by redundancy, with data in numerous data centers; if one goes offline, others can provide failover to keep communication running smoothly.    Considerations for Unified Communications in Remote Work   When looking for a provider for this cloud platform, security protocol is one primary concern. What security features do they have to protect your critical communications and conversations? Is the data encrypted in transit and at rest? How many users can be accommodated? Another thing to ask about is whether the provider offers training in the different tools that UCaaS provides. You might also need to train your workers in collaboration skills like clear verbal and written communication; managing time, projects and deadlines;...
Review Your Strategy For Cloud Security

Review Your Strategy For Cloud Security

Many businesses have taken advantage of cloud computing for its benefits–its flexibility, ability to help companies scale use according to demand, and a subscription-based pricing model, among others. When migrating to the Cloud it is important that you develop a cloud security strategy. Your company can exert a good deal of control over cloud security concerns with proper policy, training and technology. Read on to learn more about what to include in your cloud security strategy in order to protect technology assets.   Assessing Your Strategy for Cloud Security   Reacting to problems is vital, of course. But what if you could prevent many problems before they even occur? Powerful technologies like Cloud Computing can also create complexity, so it is important to have a strategy that includes policies for protecting your applications and their data. If you already have a security strategy, it’s not too soon to assess it and to adjust accordingly.    Implementing your Cloud Security Strategy According to an article on cloud security mitigation by CompTIA, access control is a top cause of problems. Examples include lack of specification of who can have access to your business applications, or holes in security that could leave you vulnerable to a full-blown data breach. It may be time to update your security policies, using the “zero-trust” model to authenticate every single request for access to the network. Setting policy to limit administrative access minimizes risks and avoids unexpected consequences. Other considerations in your cloud security strategy deal with handling a data breach or loss, and the role and how to quickly revoke access as needed (e.g. revoking...
Skip to content